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US Army Veteran With Cancer Begs Kansas Senate To Legalize Medical Cannabis As He Is ‘Running Out Of Time’

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By Nina Zdinjak

The Kansas House of Representatives recently appointed key lawmakers from both chambers to a conference committee that will lay out details for a medical marijuana legalization bill. Cannabis advocates called the move a clear sign that reform is inevitable and can be expected soon.

However, it seems that Senate Bill 12, which is still in committee, will not gain traction when lawmakers return on May 23 to tie up the legislative session.

Photo by Ivan-balvan/Getty Images

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“Given we plan to only be there one day, it’s unlikely that work could be completed on that item,” Mike Pirner, a spokesman for Senate Leadership told Kansas Capitol Bureau in an email.

Without accessibility to medical marijuana, many patients in the state are struggling, some from terminal diseases, such as cancer. One of them is a U.S. Army veteran and resident of Paradise, Kansas. His name is David Auble. Despite his serious condition, Auble is not only fighting for his life, he’s also pushing for cannabis reform.

A lifelong Republican who supported Trump, Auble sent a letter to members of the Kansas Senate explaining how some cancer patients like himself are in desperate need of cannabis, and how the plant can and does help the symptoms, reported The Wichita Eagle.

Addressing the letter to Senate President Ty Masterson and members of the Kansas Senate, Auble wrote:

“I’m running out of time.

I’m fighting cancer and am running out of options for treatment. 

The steroids I’ve been on since September are making me weaker and weaker.

I can barely lift my head; my legs are tingly and I have a trachea breathing tube. You have no idea how terrifying it is when you can’t move air in or out.

This is actually my second bout with cancer. After suffering tremendous pain the first time — having part of my jaw and front of my neck removed — I learned how patients in other states have benefited from medicinal cannabis.”

The Veteran further explained that he’s been advocating for medical marijuana in the state for over five years.

Auble had previously met with Sens. Rob Olson and Dinah Sykes and a representative of the governor’s office, all of whom gave him hope and encouragement that they’d push for MMJ legalization.

Political Power Versus The Lives Of The People 

“My hope was that this session would be ‘the year’ and that treatment would be available to help my situation. With the House passing the bill in 2021, there has been plenty of time for you and other senators who have questions or concerns to learn about the benefits of medicinal cannabis,” Auble wrote.

“I’ve sent you messages, called your office and yet, I’ve heard nothing back.

“I know you were also invited to the meeting with other senators prior to the start of session. I guess if you don’t respond or engage with me, you don’t have to think about the suffering I am going through. It feels you are more worried about political power than the lives of the people you represent,” he wrote.

medical marijuana
Photo by LPETTET/Getty Images

RELATED: Kansas Democrats Unveil Plan To Put Marijuana Legalization On 2022 Ballot

Auble also revealed that while his friends suggested he get cannabis illegally, he didn’t want to do it that way. “That’s not who I am,” he said, further revealing how serious and life-threatening his condition is.

“If you won’t even help me, then my guess is you really aren’t interested in helping anyone. If you can’t make decisions for the good of the people, then you shouldn’t be making decisions at all.”

Final Plea 

“I know you return to session May 23. I am asking you to please do the right thing and help patients like myself who are suffering,” Auble wrote.

RELATED: Why The Military Should Have Reduced The Penalties For Getting Caught With Weed

In conclusion, he invited Senate members to come and visit and see for themselves what cancer is doing to him and to determine how medical marijuana could help minimize his pain and suffering, something he already knows.

Will they listen this time? We sincerely hope so.

This article originally appeared on Benzinga and has been reposted with permission.

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